How do I know when it is time to harvest the potatoes? There are some plants that you should not plant potatoes like onions , squash, pumpkin, cucumber , sunflower, tomato , and raspberry . Water the potatoes until the pot drains, then place them in a spot that gets full sun. There are 12 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. These need to stay in the ground longer and require more space to produce a decent crop. Bernie Wighton is a Professional Gardener with over 35 years of experience. ", https://www.growveg.com/guides/how-to-grow-super-early-potatoes/, https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/vegetables/potatoes, https://www.growveg.com/guides/how-to-choose-the-best-potatoes-to-grow-in-your-garden/, http://blog.seedsavers.org/blog/tips-for-growing-potatoes, https://harvesttotable.com/how_to_grow_potatoes/, https://www.growveg.com/guides/a-simple-way-to-get-high-yields-of-potatoes/, https://garden.org/learn/articles/view/571/, https://lovelygreens.com/when-to-harvest-potatoes/, https://www.todayshomeowner.com/are-green-potatoes-poisonous/, consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. As potatoes grow, the plant sends up a main shoot that develops leaves and flowers. The process of growing potatoes is simple.– Just move down to Step 1 to get started. The only thing better than one potato is two! Avoid overwatering your potatoes or you could damage them. The “eye” should be facing upward. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. Harvest your potatoes in 18-20 weeks once the leaves turn yellow. Planted towards the end of March, they are typically ready for lifting from late June or early July. Do not eat green potatoes or green parts of potatoes - these are poisonous in large quantities. Expert gardeners recommend planting potatoes around the time of last expected frost, but that time can vary based on where you live. How to grow potatoes. Cover each potato with about three inches of soil. Be sure to spade or loosen the soil extremely well. Grow your potatoes from Tui Certified Seed Potatoes – these are certified to ensure they are true to type, and will grow a healthy crop. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. If you live in a hotter climate, your soil will get drier quicker and will need to be watered more often. To find out when you can plant a fall crop of potatoes in your area you need to know your first frost date. King Edward, Kerrs Pink, and Harmony are all good examples of this variety. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. Plant seed potatoes 12 inches apart and cover with about 3 inches of soil. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. They prefer their soil moist, but not waterlogged. % of people told us that this article helped them. Plant seed potatoes 6 inches (15 cm) apart with sprouts face up. Yes, the potato must have germinating buds prior to planting. Gently cover the tubers with compost. Every 4 to 6 weeks for 3 sowings if you have a long growing season. There is only one requirement: Make sure every single part of the potato you plant has at least one eye bud (this is where they start to germinate). All tip submissions are carefully reviewed before being published. Once the plants are well established and are in flower can give them a liquid feed. Select a variety of seed potatoes that suits your tastes/how long you want to wait for your potatoes … wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. Potato tubers are potatoes that have been prepped for planting--as opposed to potato seeds or potatoes that are not prepped. If the leaves of the plant look like they're wilting, then your potatoes need more water. Keep the rows about three feet apart. Plant the potato chunks with the cut side of your chunk facing down into the soil and the sprout or "eyes" pointing up and about 3-4" below the soil level in your mounds. Potatoes are tasty, multifunctional, and relatively easy to grow. There are 12 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. Potatoes are classified according to the length of time they take to mature, which can be influenced by weather. If you want to plant potatoes from a seed company or garden supply center, make sure that they are from a disease-free strain. One week is ample time for your sprouts to grow between. Many species of potatoes will grow into tubers large enough to eat after 10 weeks, but leaving them in the ground longer will yield the largest crop. Potatoes have no tough shell to need softened by soaking as some seeds do and they have all the moisture they need for sprouting in the flesh of the potato itself. Bernie has a Diploma in Complete Gardening Skills. This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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