The lines above and below are also thicker. Post Aug 13, 2019 #1 2019-08-13T09:21. It was in very good condition. I’m looking to by my first acoustic. Yamaha’s Red Label guitars were introduced to America in 1968, but the line itself goes back to October 1966. Anyway, I would buy the guitar in a heartbeat. So I was interested to hear the experiences of those who have played both guitars. Registered Member. Yamaha FG’s have gone thru many changes since their introduction in 1966. However, I had not considered a Yamaha until I heard it. These were well-constructed, great-sounding guitars from Japan that were made in the classic tradition of steel-string, flat-top guitar design and tone, with their own innovative tweaks. I know in the old days a lot of bluegrassers that could afford a second Martin used them as their backup guitar. After my research online I thought I’d end up with a Martin. Thanks for visiting. I know in the old days a lot of bluegrassers that could afford a second Martin used them as their backup guitar. Location: Ohio the heart of it all. I've had 2 Red Label FG180s and 4 Gold label ones ('70s period). Welcome to r/guitar, a community devoted to the exchange of guitar related information and entertainment. I realized that I enjoy a more mellow, warm sound that the mahogany back and sides provide. If that's not a selling point for one of these guitars, I don't know what is! I thought I would get a Larrivee L-03 in the future, but I didn't like the feel and sound last time I played one. There's an interesting thread over at the AGF right now with a Yamaha guitars timeline. Any other models aren't worth that much from what I've noticed. Am I losing / missing out on anything by not getting a Martin? The one I bid on sold for only $290. I own a Yamaha FS5 Red Label for about 3 months or so now. Watch this one and see what happens: Back in the early '70s in Louisville, I played lots of long solo nights. The Unofficial Martin Guitar Forum > Guitars > The Guitar Critic's Corner > New Yamaha FG5. The production table posted on the acoustic guitar forum indicates that the red label guitars were introduced in 1969. Yamaha has clearly pulled out all the stops on these Japanese made Red Label guitars. I did some research on the Nippon Gakki instruments and learned that they are highly respected and very affordable. Prices should be between $100 and $300 depending on model. Some are obvious, some are not. I had a red label FG-180 30 years ago, based [as Dave notes] on its "poor-man's Martin" reputation. They were so popular because they were affordable and widely available, and because they sounded and played great. After quietly celebrating the 50th anniversary of the iconic red label acoustics in 2016, Yamaha decided it was time to revisit the range, employing some modern tweaks and upgrades along the way. The FGX5 should be equally impressive. 3,078 756 3. it was said back in the '70s but I never saw one and haven't still, there were Yams that were solid from then but carried a 700 series red label (I think), played one about 3 years ago in a pawn shop, wanted $1200 for it as I remember, was good but not that good, certainly did look great however, Kerry, This website uses cookies for functionality, analytics and advertising purposes as described in our, Queen Annes Revenge, loyal sea dog, grog. Wow, Frank thanks for that link! 3,078 756 3. There's been a bunch of these threads about Yamaha red labels and laminates vs solid etc. The FGX5 is absolutely world class in every way. I figured it was good enough for New Grass Revival's guitarist, Curtis Birch, so it'd work for me. But the salesman showed me a Yamaha FGX5 Red Label ($1300) and I was blown away by how awesome it sounded. There’s no Martin’s at any of the guitar shops within an hour and a half of my local area. 24 posts 1; 2; Next; New Yamaha FG5 New Yamaha FG5. He is looking to get rid of it and I have heard good things about these in the past. Press J to jump to the feed. Let us know the model of the one your friend has and where made. Golden Nehru Jacket Award, Friends of The Gopher Society, http://cgi.ebay.com/71-Ya...ZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem, http://www.acousticguitar...s/showthread.php?t=145187. The change to the common label happened in June/July 1967. The FG-300 is a real good take on the Gibson Hummingbird, and has a country sound that will make you cry. Through the ’70s, the mod… I was happy to hear that he remains enamored with his Yamaha. Any other models aren't worth that much from what I've noticed. He also noted that he bought a later model FG-180 with a red label and that it did not sound nearly as good as his older FG. The guitar that belongs to Paul Brady is from 1967. Registered User : Join Date: Dec 2016. On Ebay last week, I bid on (and unfortunately lost) a 1967 FG-180 red label. New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast. The tone of Paul Brady's guitar has always attracted me, so on a whim I decided to send him an e-mail and ask for his thoughts on the FG. The Yamaha Red Label FG-180 is the only one that I know of that is particularly sought after. An old friend has a Yamaha Red label guitar that was owned by his grandfather. An Unofficial forum for those who love Martin instruments - Founded by Steve Stallings. I'm not sure of the model numbers but have played a couple that were pretty good for sure. He stills owns and plays it regularly, though he now plays Lowdens during performances and recording. What we have in the test area today is a from the reissued Red Label range, a Japanese-built FG5. What we have in the test area today is a from the reissued Red Label range, a Japanese-built FG5. Buena Park, CA (April 26, 2019) -- Yamaha today launched the FG Red Label series of acoustic guitars, blending the vintage, handcrafted design of iconic early Yamaha instruments with the company’s cutting-edge technological innovation in wood conditioning and true-to-life sound reproduction.. Yamaha’s Red Label guitars were introduced to America in 1968, but the line itself goes back to October 1966. So when I researched what that involves on these old red labels, I learned they're notorious for having epoxied neck joints that are impossible to steam apart. Yamaha’s new FG/FS Red Label lineup visually evokes those early red-label FG Yamaha steel-strings. Back then I played hard enough and long enough to bust strings during a gig, and so need a backup, so I got my first FG-180 Yamaha. I had him play it back to back with a Taylor 317, (unfortunately the shop didn’t have any Martins) and the FGX5 sounded fantastic. Sounds like you may have found one of the luck few 45 year old red label Yamaha's that still doesn't need a … Well made guitars. What should I look for and how much are these worth? I also like the Taylor 322E, but that is a lot more expensive, and tbh, still not as good as the Yamahas. I more than likely am wrong, but I have a vague memory that at one point maybe in the sixties, the FG-180 had a solid top. I will find a late 60's FG-180 one day. I've been obsessing over how amazing those Yamahas I've tried have sounded and felt. I had him play it back to back with a Taylor 317, (unfortunately the shop didn’t have any Martins) and the FGX5 sounded fantastic. As a working and not wealthy musician, I was doing good to afford my D-28, but no way could I afford a second Martin for backup. This is a forum where guitarists, from novice to experienced, can explore the world of guitar through a variety of media and discussion. it needs a neck reset, which is not worth doing and I've seen pretty many with this problem, the Japan ones are a little more valuable, I've seen them sell at $400. For me, the best Martin in the same price range is the 000-15m, but the Yamaha is just flat out better. I should have stayed in and won the thing, but I was out of town when the bidding was concluded and had set my max bid too low. He graciously gave me all the details of his guitar, including its purchase price, where and when he bought it and how it has faired over the years.